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McCloy DE-1038 - History

McCloy DE-1038 - History


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McCloy

Lt. Comdr. John McCloy, recipient of two Medals of Honor, was born 30 January 1876 at Brewster, N.Y. He enlisted in the U.S. Navy 7 March 1903, was warranted boatswain 30 July 1903 and commissioned ensign 1 July 1917. He received his first Medal of Honor "for distinguished conduct in the presence of the enemy in battles of the 13th, 20th, 21st, and 22d of June 1900, while with the relief expedition of the Allied Forces in China." His second Medal of Honor was awarded to him "for distinguished conduct in battle and extraordinary heroism; engagement of Vera Cruz, April 22, 1914." Immediately after World War I, he commanded minesweeper Curlew clearing the mines of the North Sea mine barrage. For this work he was decorated with the Navy Cross. He retired from active duty, as lieutenant, 15 October 1928 and on 23 February 1942 was promoted to lieutenant commander, retired. He died 25 May 1945 at Leonia, N.J., and was buried in Arlington National Cemetery.

(DE-1038: dp. 2,650 (f.) ; 1. 371'6"; b. 40'8"; dr. 14'; cpl. 193; s. 25 k.; a. 3 3", 2 tt., ASROC, DASH; el. Bronstein)

McCloy was laid down by the Avondale Shipyards, Inc., Westwego, La., 15 September 1961; launched 9 June 1962; sponsored by Mrs. Arthur Winstead; and commissioned 21 October 1963 at Charleston, S.C., Comdr. Thomas Sherman in command.

Following outfitting and shakedown McCloy, assigned to Escort Squadron 10, reported to her home port, Newport, R.I., in January 1964. In October, after further specialized training, she commenced training sonar technicians. Employed primarily as a schoolship throughout 1965, she also tested new ASW weapons systems for the Operational Test and Evaluation Force. During this period she enhanced her training and-testing capabilities as well as her operational abilities by participating in joint United States-Canadian exercises in the spring and fall and in ASW exercises at the end of the year.

In 1966 cruises saw her in the Bermuda area for NATO exercises (April) ; off the New England and Virginia coasts for convoy escort and ASW exercises (June, July, and August) ; and in the Caribbean for fleet tactical exercises (November-December). From 16 January until 24 May 1967 she participated in Match Maker II. This operation, which took McCloy from the Caribbean to northern Europe, was conducted jointly by American, Dutch, British, and Canadian ships. In what was called "Cross Pollinization," McCloymen transferred to the Dutch destroyer Limburg (D-814) and the British frigate Berwick (F-115) while men of those ships came on board the American escort vessel.

McCloy spent the last half of 1967 and the first months of 1968 at Boston, undergoing overhaul. She got underway again in March and sailed south, the next month, for refresher training at Guantanamo Bay. Returning to Newport in June, she departed again 8 July for another extended cruise. On the 11th she arrived at San Juan where she joined naval units of the United States, Brazil, and Colombia for UNITAS IX. On the 15th, they commenced a clockwise circumnavigation of South America which first involved ships and planes of eight nations in exercises in the Atlantic, then around the Horn to the Pacific for more of the same, and finally through the Panama Canal back into the Caribbean before the end of the year. She continues her operations in the Atlantic into 1969.


Early days [ edit | edit source ]

McCloy was laid down by the Avondale Shipyard, Inc., Westwego, Louisiana, 15 September 1961 launched 9 June 1962 sponsored by Mrs. Arthur Winstead and commissioned 21 October 1963 at Charleston, South Carolina, Comdr. Thomas Sherman in command.

Following outfitting and shakedown McCloy, assigned to Escort Squadron 10, reported to her home port, Newport, Rhode Island, in January 1964. In October, after further specialized training, she commenced training sonar technicians. Employed primarily as a schoolship throughout 1965, she also tested new anti-submarine warfare (ASW) weapons systems for the Operational Test and Evaluation Force. During this period she enhanced her training and testing capabilities as well as her operational abilities by participating in joint United States-Canadian exercises in the spring and fall and in ASW exercises at the end of the year.

In 1966 cruises saw her in the Bermuda area for NATO exercises (April) off the New England and Virginia coasts for convoy escort and ASW exercises (June, July, and August) and in the Caribbean for fleet tactical exercises (November–December). From 16 January until 24 May 1967 she participated in Match Maker 11. This operation, which took McCloy from the Caribbean to northern Europe, was conducted jointly by American, Dutch, British, and Canadian ships. In what was called "Cross Pollinization," McCloy men transferred to the Dutch destroyer HNLMS Limburg (D814) and the British frigate HMS Berwick (F115) while men of those ships came on board the American escort vessel.

McCloy spent the last half of 1967 and the first months of 1968 at Boston, Massachusetts, undergoing overhaul. She got underway again in March and sailed south, the next month, for refresher training at Guantanamo Bay. Returning to Newport in June, she departed again 8 July for another extended cruise. On the 11th she arrived at San Juan, Puerto Rico where she joined naval units of the United States, Brazil, and Colombia for UNITAS IX. On the 15th, they commenced a clockwise circumnavigation of South America which first involved ships and planes of eight nations in exercises in the Atlantic, then around the Horn to the Pacific for more of the same, and finally through the Panama Canal back into the Caribbean before the end of the year. She continued her operations in the Atlantic into 1969. Ώ]

McCloy was reclassified as a frigate (FF-1038) on 30 June 1975.


From empiricism to rational design: a personal perspective of the evolution of vaccine development

Vaccination, which is the most effective medical intervention that has ever been introduced, originated from the observation that individuals who survived a plague or smallpox would not get the disease twice. To mimic the protective effects of natural infection, Jenner - and later Pasteur - inoculated individuals with attenuated or killed disease-causing agents. This empirical approach inspired a century of vaccine development and the effective prophylaxis of many infectious diseases. From the 1980s, several waves of new technologies have enabled the development of novel vaccines that would not have been possible using the empirical approach. The technological revolution in the field of vaccination is now continuing, and it is delivering novel and safer vaccines. In this Timeline article, we provide our views on the transition from empiricism to rational vaccine design.

Conflict of interest statement

Ennio De Gregorio and Rino Rappuoli are full-time employees and shareholders of Novartis Vaccines. The following products are commercialized by Novartis or are in the pipeline of Novartis Vaccines: MF59 adjuvant TLR7-based adjuvants vaccines against Haemophilus influenzae , meningococcus serogroups B, C and ACYW, influenza virus, pertussis, respiratory syncytial virus, and group A and group B streptococcus and RNA vaccines based on self-amplifying mRNA (SAM).

Figures

Figure 1. A timeline of the history…

Figure 1. A timeline of the history of vaccines showing the technologies that have enabled…


You've only scratched the surface of Mccloy family history.

Between 1959 and 2004, in the United States, Mccloy life expectancy was at its lowest point in 1961, and highest in 2004. The average life expectancy for Mccloy in 1959 was 64, and 86 in 2004.

An unusually short lifespan might indicate that your Mccloy ancestors lived in harsh conditions. A short lifespan might also indicate health problems that were once prevalent in your family. The SSDI is a searchable database of more than 70 million names. You can find birthdates, death dates, addresses and more.


USPS Featured Stamps


With the issuance of the Distinguished Sailors stamps in February 2010, the U.S. Postal Service honors four sailors who served with bravery and distinction during the 20th century: William S. Sims, Arleigh A. Burke, John McCloy, and Doris Miller.

Commander of U.S. naval forces in European waters during World War I, William S. Sims (1858-1936) was an outspoken reformer and innovator who helped shape the Navy into a modern fighting force.

Sims continued to write and lecture about naval reform until his death in 1936, at which time the New York Herald Tribune declared that he had “influenced our naval course more than any man who ever wore the uniform.” The Navy has named three destroyers after Sims. The most recent, USS W. S. Sims (DE-1059), was commissioned in 1970.

The William S. Sims stamp features a detail from a photograph of Sims (1919). Beside the photograph is a depiction of the crest of the destroyer escort USS W. S. Sims (DE-1059), which was commissioned in 1970.

After serving as one of the top destroyer squadron commanders of World War II, Arleigh A. Burke (1901-1996) had an equally distinguished postwar career in which he played a major role in modernizing the Navy and guiding its response to the Cold War.

When Burke died in 1996, he was hailed as a “sailor’s sailor” who defined what it meant to be a naval officer: “relentless in combat, resourceful in command, and revered by his crews.”

The Arleigh A. Burke stamp features a detail from a photograph of Burke (1951). Beside the photograph is a depiction of the crest of the guided missile destroyer USS Arleigh Burke (DDG-51), which was commissioned in 1991.

Described by a shipmate as “like a bull” who couldn’t be stopped, John McCloy (1876-1945) has the distinction of being one of the few men in the nation’s history to earn two Medals of Honor for separate acts of heroism.

McCloy retired from active duty in 1928 after a thirty-year career in the Navy and “a lifetime of service on all the seven seas,” as the Kansas City Star put it. His service record notes that in 1942 he was advanced on the retired list to lieutenant commander after being “specially commended by the Secretary of the Navy for performance of duty in actual combat.” McCloy died in 1945. In 1963, the Navy commissioned a destroyer escort, USS McCloy (DE-1038), which was named in his honor.

The John McCloy stamp features a detail from a photograph of McCloy (circa 1920). Beside the photograph is a depiction of the crest of the destroyer escort, USS McCloy (DE-1038), which was commissioned in 1963.

The first African American hero of World War II, Doris Miller (1919-1943) became an inspiration to generations of Americans for his actions at Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941.

Although he was only the first of a number of African Americans to be recognized for their heroism in World War II, Miller is singularly remembered for providing inspiration to a campaign for equal recognition and opportunity for Blacks in the military, a campaign that bore fruit in 1948 when President Truman ordered “that there shall be equality and opportunity for all persons in the armed forces.”

The Doris Miller stamp features a detail from a photograph of Miller (1942). Beside the photograph is a depiction of the crest of the destroyer escort USS Miller (DE-1091), which was commissioned in 1973.


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USS McCloy DE 1038

Commissioned 21 October 1963

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Over 27 pictures 33 pages.

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The Hatfield & McCoy Feud

The Hatfields and McCoys. Mere mention of their names stirs up visions of a lawless and unrelenting family feud. It evokes gun-toting vigilantes hell-bent on defending their kinfolk, igniting bitter grudges that would span generations. Yet many people familiar with these surnames may know little about the faded history of these two families and the legends they inspired. Who were the Hatfields and McCoys, and what was the source of this vicious and violent clash between the families?

During the most heated years of the feud, each family was ruled by a well-known patriarch. William Anderson Hatfield, known as “Devil Anse,” had the appearance of a backwoods, rough-hewn mountain dweller. By the 1870s Devil Anse was an increasingly successful timber merchant who employed dozens of men, including some McCoys. On the other side of the feud stood Randolph “Old Ranel” McCoy. Though not as prosperous as Devil Anse, Randolph owned some land and livestock. Both families lived along the Tug Fork of the Big Sandy River, which snaked along the boundary between Kentucky and West Virginia, and both families had complex kinship and social networks. Family loyalty was often determined not only by blood but by employment and proximity. The families even intermarried and sometimes switched family loyalties, even once the feud had started.

The first event in the decades-long feud was the 1865 murder of Randolph’s brother, Asa Harmon McCoy, by the Logan Wildcats, a local militia group that counted Devil Anse and other Hatfields among its members. Many people—even members of his own family—regarded Asa Harmon, who had served in the Union Army during the American Civil War, as a traitor. While some have surmised that his murder set the stage for the feud, most historians now see this incident as a standalone event.

Relations between the two families continued to sour over the next decade before flaring again over a seemingly small matter: a dispute over a single hog. In 1878 Randolph McCoy accused Floyd Hatfield, a cousin of Devil Anse, of stealing one of his pigs, a valuable commodity in the poor region. Floyd Hatfields’s trial took place in McCoy territory but was presided over by a cousin of Devil Anse. It hinged on the testimony of star witness Bill Staton, a McCoy relative married to a Hatfield. Staton testified in Floyd Hatfield’s favor, and the McCoys were infuriated when Floyd was cleared of the charges against him. Two years later, Staton was violently killed in a fracas with Sam and Paris McCoy, nephews of Randolph. Sam stood trial for the murder but was acquitted for self-defense reasons.

Within months of Staton’s murder, a heated affair of a different sort was set ablaze. At a local election day gathering in 1880, Johnse Hatfield, the 18-year-old son of Devil Anse, encountered Roseanna McCoy, Randolph’s daughter. According to accounts, Johnse and Roseanna hit it off, disappearing together for hours. Supposedly fearing retaliation from her family for mingling with the Hatfields, Roseanna stayed at the Hatfield residence for a period of time, drawing the ire of the McCoys.

Although they certainly shared a romance, it rapidly became clear that Johnse was not about to settle down with Roseanna. Several months later he abandoned the pregnant Roseanna and quickly moved on. In May 1881 he married Nancy McCoy, Roseanna’s cousin. According to the romanticized legend, Roseanna was heartbroken by these events and never recovered emotionally.

The real turning point in the feud, according to most historical accounts, occurred on another local election day in August 1882. Three of Randolph McCoy’s sons ended up in a violent dispute with two brothers of Devil Anse. The fight soon snowballed into chaos as one of the McCoy brothers stabbed Ellison Hatfield multiple times and then shot him in the back. Authorities soon apprehended the McCoys, but the Hatfields interceded, spiriting the men to Hatfield territory. After receiving word that Ellison had died, they bound the McCoys to some pawpaw bushes. Within minutes, they fired more than 50 shots, killing all three brothers.

Though the Hatfields might have felt their revenge was warranted, the law felt otherwise, quickly returning indictments against 20 men, including Devil Anse and his sons. Despite the charges, the Hatfields eluded arrest, leaving the McCoys boiling with anger about the murders and outraged that the Hatfields walked free. Their cause was taken up by Perry Cline, an attorney who was married to Martha McCoy, the widow of Randolph’s brother Asa Harmon. Years earlier Cline had lost a lawsuit against Devil Anse over the deed for thousands of acres of land, and many historians believe this left him looking for his own form of revenge. Using his political connections, Cline had the charges against the Hatfields reinstated. He announced rewards for the arrest of the Hatfields, including Devil Anse.

With the pressure cooker gathering steam, the media started to report on the feud in 1887. In their accounts, the Hatfields were often portrayed as violent backwoods hillbillies who roamed the mountains stirring up violence. The sensationalist coverage planted the seed for the rivalry to become cemented in the American imagination. What had been a local story was becoming a national legend.

The Hatfields may or may not have been paying attention to these stories, but they were certainly paying attention to the bounty on their heads. In an effort to end the commotion once and for all, a group of the Hatfields and their supporters hatched a plan to attack Randolph McCoy and his family. Led by Devil Anse’s son Cap and ally Jim Vance, a group of Hatfield men ambushed the McCoys’ home on New Year’s Day in 1888. Randolph fled, escaping into the woods. His son Calvin and daughter Alifair were killed in the crossfire his wife Sarah was left badly beaten by the Hatfields, suffering a crushed skull.

A few days after what became known as the New Year’s massacre, bounty hunter Frank Phillips chased down Jim Vance and Cap Hatfield, killing Vance. Phillips rounded up nine Hatfield family members and supporters and hauled them off to jail. Years of legal permutations unfolded as a series of courts judged the legal merits of the Hatfield case. Eventually, the case went all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, which decided that the Hatfields being held in custody could be tried.

The trial began in 1889, and in the end, eight of the Hatfields and their supporters were sentenced to life in prison. Ellison Mounts, who was believed to be the son of Ellison Hatfield, was sentenced to death. Nicknamed Cottontop, Mounts was known to be mentally challenged, and many viewed him as a scapegoat even though he had confessed his guilt. Although public executions were against the law in Kentucky, thousands of spectators gathered to witness the hanging of Ellison Mounts on February 18, 1890. Reports claim that his last words were: “They made me do it! The Hatfields made me do it!”

As the feud faded, both family leaders attempted to recede into relative obscurity. Randolph McCoy became a ferry operator. In 1914 he died at the age of 88 from burns suffered in an accidental fire. By all accounts, he continued to be haunted by the deaths of his children. Devil Anse Hatfield, who had long proclaimed his skepticism about religion, was born again later in life when he was baptized for the first time at age 73. Although the conflict subsided generations ago, the names Hatfield and McCoy continue to loom large in the American imagination.


What Is the History of Polvorones De Canele?

Polvorones de canele are a type of cookie that originated in Medieval Arabia. The cookie was introduced to Europe and then the New World by explorers in the 16th century. Medieval polvorones had a high amount of sugar and often contained almonds and spices.

Polvorones de canele is a type of polvorone cookie that is rolled in cinnamon. In the United States, these cookies are known as Mexican wedding cookies. In Mexico, they often contain pecans and are served during weddings and other celebrations.

When the Moors moved to the region of Andalusia in Spain, they brought their traditional cuisine, including polvorones. During the Spanish Inquisition, officials stated that the cookies should be made with pork fat. This was to be used as a method of finding any Muslims and Jews living in southern Spain.

Spanish explorers brought polvorones to Latin America and the Philippines, where they continue to be popular during holidays. Historically, they were baked from September to January, but in modern times, they are available throughout the year.

Polvorones de canele are typically made with butter, flour, vanilla extract, powdered sugar, salt and cinnamon. After the ingredients are combined, the dough is rolled into small balls, which are then rolled in cinnamon sugar before baking.


McCloy DE-1038 - History

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