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Simpson DD- 221 - History

Simpson DD- 221 - History


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Simpson
(DD-221: dp. 1,216; 1. 314'41/2''; b. 30'11" dr. 94's. 35 k.; cpl. 122; a. 4 4", 1 3", 12 2i" tt.; cl Clemson)

Simpson (DD-221) was laid down on 9 October 1919 by William Cramp and Sons, Philadelphia, Pa. launched on 28 April 1920, sponsored by Miss Caroline Sterett Simpson, daughter of Rear Admiral Simpson; and commissioned on 3 November 1920, Lt. Comdr. F.T. Berry in command.

Simpson conducted training exercises with the Pacific Fleet during her first year of service, including a cruise to Valparaiso, Chile. She then transited the Panama Canal on 12 December 1921; and, after overhaul at Philadelphia, she sailed from Newport, R.I., for the Mediterranean on 6 June 1922. Between 29 June 1922 and 26 February 1924, Simpson served as a unit of the United States Naval Detachment in Turkish waters under Rear Admiral Mark L. Bristol, protecting American interests during the unrest in the Near East following World War I. Simpson was at Smyrna in September 1923 as the Greek front in Asia Minor collapsed and, on 13 September, after witnessing the massacre of numerous Armenians and the setting of large fires by the Turks, she evacuated the American citizens from the city and carried them to Greece. She then resumed her duties of monitoring the evacuation of Greek refugees from Turkey, protecting United States citizens, and aiding the work of the American Relief Association in the Black Sea and eastern Mediterranean. After a tour of ports in the western Mediterranean and the English Channel Simpson departed Southampton England, on 1 July 1924 for overhaul at Norfolk. She then underwent training in the Caribbean and on the west coast before crossing the Pacific for duty with the Asiatic Fleet.

Upon arrival at Chefoo, China, on 14 June 1925 Simpson entered the routine of the Asiatic Fleet, training at bases in Tsingtao and Chefoo in the summer and Manila in the winter, and visiting Chinese ports during the transit each way. During 1925, unrest in China increased, due to the growth in strength of the Kuominbang forces under Chiang Kai-shek and anti-foreign outbreaks at Shanghai and Canton. Destroyers were detached from the fleet to supplement the normal gunboat patrols on the Yangtze and along the southern coast of China near Canton. Simpson rescued some missionaries at Deep Bay, China, on 2 and 3 July 1925; and, during the next several years, carried out numerous patrols in Chinese waters protecting American lives and property. The destroyer was stationed at Nanking when Japan launched an air and sea attack on Shanghai at the end of January 1932, and she supported American diplomats in the Chinese capital during the critical early days of the crisis, as well as sending important reports to Washington. On 11 February, she moved to Shanghai and, on 23 February, to Swatow where she remained until 2 April 1932. On 18 April, Simpson departed Manila with her squadron to return to the United States.

After overhaul at Mare Island Simpson joined Destroyers, Battle Force, at San Diego on 28 September 1932 and conducted fleet exercises and training along the west coast during the next several years. During night exercises in a fleet problem off Guantanamo Bay Simpson collided with the cruiser, Milwaukee (CL 5), on 7 May 1934, and she underwent repairs at the Philadelphia Navy Yard and summer training at Newport before returning to San Diego on 10 November. She then resumed training with the Pacific Fleet and participated in fleet problems annually in 1936, 1937, and 1938.

On 6 March 1939, Simpson transited the Panama Canal to the Atlantic; and, between 5 June and 30 August 1939 she carried out three training cruises for Naval Academy midshipmen. She then commenced training cruises for Naval Reservists, but, at the outbreak of war in Europe, she was assigned Neutrality Patrol duty and sailed for the Caribbean on 6 September. There she carried out patrols and participated in exercises, including a fleet landing exercise at Culebra from 14 February to 10 March 1940. After one training cruise for midshipmen and one for reservists during the summer, she resumed Neutrality Patrol duties in the Caribbean in October.

Simpson was part of a support force formed on 18 March 1941, after the signature of the Lend Lease Act, to protect convoys between America and Britain in the North Atlantic. After several months of coastal escort and patrol duties, she escorted two convoys from Argentia to a rendezvous with British escorts off Greenland between 30 June and 3 September 1941. On 24 September, off Iceland, she joined the first westbound convoy to be escorted by American warships and delivered it safely to Argentia on 4 October. After United States entry into the war in December, her convoy trips were extended to the British Isles, and she remained on transatlantic convoy duty until 28 April 1942, when she entered the Boston Navy Yard for overhaul.

For nearly a year after leaving the yard in May 1942, Simpson escorted convoys up and down the United States east coast. She made one trip to Casablanca in February 1943; and, on 28 April 1943, began overhaul at the New York Navy Yard. At sea again in May, Simpson escorted a convoy from New York to Curacao in the West Indies, and then made two round-trip voyages between Curacao and Londonderry, Northern Ireland. On 29 August 1943, Simpson joined an escort carrier task group centered around Santee (CVE-29) and escorted a convoy from Bermuda to Casablanca. The task group then carried out antisubmarine patrols off the Azores. The group joined a westbound convoy on 22 September but resumed antisubmarine sweeps after a submarine was reported near the Azores on 26 September. Simpson returned to the United States on 12 October but was back in the Azores conducting additional patrols between 28 October and 9 December 1943

Simpson was designated on 1 December 1943 for conversion to a fast transport, APD-27, but was replaced in January 1944 by George E:. Badger (DD-196), whose conversion was in turn cancelled. Resuming her convoy duties, Simpson escorted Antaeus (AG-67) for over three months from 29 December 1943 to 9 April 1944 as she carried troops up and down the east coast. During the remainder of 1944 and early 1945, Simpson escorted new heavy combatant ships on shakedown and training exercises along the east coast. Among the ships she served were the battleships Wisconsin and Missouri, the large cruiser Alaska, and the carriers Ticonderoga and Antietam.

Simpson was reclassified a miscellaneous auxiliary (AG-97), effective 23 May 1945. All her armament was removed, and she was fitted with racks for exercise torpedoes and a winch for handling towed targets. She arrived at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, on 16 June 1945 and provided training services where for nearly a year. On 11 May 1946, the veteran ship arrived at the Philadelphia Navy Yard for inactivation. Struck from the Navy list on 19 June 1946, Simpson was sold on 21 November 1946 to Northern Metals Co., Philadelphia, Pa., for scrapping.


DD-221 Simpson

Simpson (DD-221) was laid down on 9 October 1919 by William Cramp and Sons, Philadelphia, Pa. launched on 28 April 1920, sponsored by Miss Caroline Sterett Simpson, daughter of Rear Admiral Simpson and commissioned on 3 November 1920, Lt. Comdr. F.T. Berry in command.

Simpson conducted training exercises with the Pacific Fleet during her first year of service, including a cruise to Valparaiso, Chile. She then transited the Panama Canal on 12 December 1921 and, after overhaul at Philadelphia, she sailed from Newport, R.I., for the Mediterranean on 6 June 1922. Between 29 June 1922 and 26 February 1924, Simpson served as a unit of the United States Naval Detachment in Turkish waters under Rear Admiral Mark L. Bristol, protecting American interests during the unrest in the Near East following World War I. Simpson was at Smyrna in September 1923 as the Greek front in Asia Minor collapsed and, on 13 September, after witnessing the massacre of numerous Armenians and the setting of large fires by the Turks, she evacuated the American citizens from the city and carried them to Greece. She then resumed her duties of monitoring the evacuation of Greek refugees from Turkey, protecting United States citizens, and aiding the work of the American Relief Association in the Black Sea and eastern Mediterranean. After a tour of ports in the western Mediterranean and the English Channel Simpson departed Southampton England, on 1 July 1924 for overhaul at Norfolk. She then underwent training in the Caribbean and on the west coast before crossing the Pacific for duty with the Asiatic Fleet.

Upon arrival at Chefoo, China, on 14 June 1925 Simpson entered the routine of the Asiatic Fleet, training at bases in Tsingtao and Chefoo in the summer and Manila in the winter, and visiting Chinese ports during the transit each way. During 1925, unrest in China increased, due to the growth in strength of the Kuominbang forces under Chiang Kai-shek and anti-foreign outbreaks at Shanghai and Canton. Destroyers were detached from the fleet to supplement the normal gunboat patrols on the Yangtze and along the southern coast of China near Canton. Simpson rescued some missionaries at Deep Bay, China, on 2 and 3 July 1925 and, during the next several years, carried out numerous patrols in Chinese waters protecting American lives and property. The destroyer was stationed at Nanking when Japan launched an air and sea attack on Shanghai at the end of January 1932, and she supported American diplomats in the Chinese capital during the critical early days of the crisis, as well as sending important reports to Washington. On 11 February, she moved to Shanghai and, on 23 February, to Swatow where she remained until 2 April 1932. On 18 April, Simpson departed Manila with her squadron to return to the United States.

After overhaul at Mare Island Simpson joined Destroyers, Battle Force, at San Diego on 28 September 1932 and conducted fleet exercises and training along the west coast during the next several years. During night exercises in a fleet problem off Guantanamo Bay Simpson collided with the cruiser, Milwaukee (CL 5), on 7 May 1934, and she underwent repairs at the Philadelphia Navy Yard and summer training at Newport before returning to San Diego on 10 November. She then resumed training with the Pacific Fleet and participated in fleet problems annually in 1936, 1937, and 1938.

On 6 March 1939, Simpson transited the Panama Canal to the Atlantic and, between 5 June and 30 August 1939 she carried out three training cruises for Naval Academy midshipmen. She then commenced training cruises for Naval Reservists, but, at the outbreak of war in Europe, she was assigned Neutrality Patrol duty and sailed for the Caribbean on 6 September. There she carried out patrols and participated in exercises, including a fleet landing exercise at Culebra from 14 February to 10 March 1940. After one training cruise for midshipmen and one for reservists during the summer, she resumed Neutrality Patrol duties in the Caribbean in October.

Simpson was part of a support force formed on 18 March 1941, after the signature of the Lend Lease Act, to protect convoys between America and Britain in the North Atlantic. After several months of coastal escort and patrol duties, she escorted two convoys from Argentia to a rendezvous with British escorts off Greenland between 30 June and 3 September 1941. On 24 September, off Iceland, she joined the first westbound convoy to be escorted by American warships and delivered it safely to Argentia on 4 October. After United States entry into the war in December, her convoy trips were extended to the British Isles, and she remained on transatlantic convoy duty until 28 April 1942, when she entered the Boston Navy Yard for overhaul.

For nearly a year after leaving the yard in May 1942, Simpson escorted convoys up and down the United States east coast. She made one trip to Casablanca in February 1943 and, on 28 April 1943, began overhaul at the New York Navy Yard. At sea again in May, Simpson escorted a convoy from New York to Curacao in the West Indies, and then made two round-trip voyages between Curacao and Londonderry, Northern Ireland. On 29 August 1943, Simpson joined an escort carrier task group centered around Santee (CVE-29) and escorted a convoy from Bermuda to Casablanca. The task group then carried out antisubmarine patrols off the Azores. The group joined a westbound convoy on 22 September but resumed antisubmarine sweeps after a submarine was reported near the Azores on 26 September. Simpson returned to the United States on 12 October but was back in the Azores conducting additional patrols between 28 October and 9 December 1943

Simpson was designated on 1 December 1943 for conversion to a fast transport, APD-27, but was replaced in January 1944 by George E:. Badger (DD-196), whose conversion was in turn canceled. Resuming her convoy duties, Simpson escorted Antaeus (AG-67) for over three months from 29 December 1943 to 9 April 1944 as she carried troops up and down the east coast. During the remainder of 1944 and early 1945, Simpson escorted new heavy combatant ships on shakedown and training exercises along the east coast. Among the ships she served were the battleships Wisconsin and Missouri, the large cruiser Alaska, and the carriers Ticonderoga and Antietam.

Simpson was reclassified a miscellaneous auxiliary (AG-97), effective 23 May 1945. All her armament was removed, and she was fitted with racks for exercise torpedoes and a winch for handling towed targets. She arrived at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, on 16 June 1945 and provided training services there for nearly a year. On 11 May 1946, the veteran ship arrived at the Philadelphia Navy Yard for inactivation. Struck from the Navy list on 19 June 1946, Simpson was sold on 21 November 1946 to Northern Metals Co., Philadelphia, Pa., for scrapping.


USS Simpson DD-221

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Ying Zheng

The state of Qin began to expand into the regions surrounding it. When the states of Shu and Ba went to war in 316 B.C., both begged for Qin’s help.

Qin responded by conquering each of them and, over the next 40 years, relocating thousands of families there, and continuing their expansionist efforts into other regions.

Ying Zheng is considered the first emperor of China. The son of King Zhuangxiang of Qin and a concubine, Ying Zheng took the throne at the age of 13, following his father’s death in 247 B.C. after three years on the throne.


Convoys escorted [ edit | edit source ]

Convoy Escort Group Dates Notes
ON 18 24 Sept-2 Oct 1941 Ώ] from Iceland to Newfoundland prior to US declaration of war
HX 154 12-19 Oct 1941 ΐ] from Newfoundland to Iceland prior to US declaration of war
ON 30 2-9 Nov 1941 Ώ] from Iceland to Newfoundland prior to US declaration of war
HX 167 29 Dec 1941-7 Jan 1942 ΐ] from Newfoundland to Iceland
ON 55 15-16 Jan 1942 Ώ] from Iceland to Newfoundland
HX 175 MOEF group A4 15-25 Feb 1942 ΐ] from Newfoundland to Northern Ireland
ON 73 MOEF group A4 6–16 March 1942 Ώ] from Northern Ireland to Newfoundland
HX 182 MOEF group A4 30 March-7 April 1942 ΐ] from Newfoundland to Northern Ireland
ON 86 MOEF group A4 14–26 April 1942 Ώ] from Northern Ireland to Newfoundland
SC 111 MOEF group A3 1-16 Dec 1942 Α] from Newfoundland to Northern Ireland
CU 2 21 May-5 June 1943 Β] from Curacao to Liverpool
UC 3 10–26 June 1943 Γ] from Liverpool to Curacao
CU 3 11–24 July 1943 Β] from Curacao to Firth of Clyde
UC 3A 30 July-10 Aug 1943 Γ] from Liverpool to Curacao

Simpson được đặt lườn vào ngày 9 tháng 10 năm 1919 tại xưởng tàu của hãng William Cramp and Sons ở Philadelphia. Nó được hạ thủy vào ngày 28 tháng 4 năm 1920, được đỡ đầu bởi cô Caroline Sterett Simpson, con gái đô đốc Simpson và được đưa ra hoạt động vào ngày 3 tháng 11 năm 1920 dưới quyền chỉ huy của Hạm trưởng, Thiếu tá Hải quân P. T. Berry.

Giữa hai cuộc thế chiến Sửa đổi

Trong năm phục vụ đầu tiên, Simpson thực hiện các cuộc thực tập huấn luyện cùng Hạm đội Thái Bình Dương, bao gồm một chuyến đi đến Valparaíso, Chile. Nó sau đó băng qua kênh đào Panama vào ngày 12 tháng 12 năm 1921, và sau một đợt đại tu tại Philadelphia, đã khởi hành từ Newport, Rhode Island vào ngày 6 tháng 6 năm 1922 để đi sang Địa Trung Hải. Từ ngày 29 tháng 6 năm 1922 đến ngày 26 tháng 2 năm 1924, nó phục vụ như một đơn vị của Lực lượng Hải quân Hoa Kỳ tại vùng biển Thổ Nhĩ Kỳ dưới quyền Chuẩn đô đốc Mark L. Bristol, có nhiệm vụ bảo vệ quyền lợi của Hoa Kỳ tại khu vực Cận Đông đầy bất ổn sau khi kết thúc Thế Chiến I. Nó đã tham gia bảo vệ công dân Hoa Kỳ và hỗ trợ hoạt động của các tổ chức cứu trợ tại Hắc Hải và vùng Đông Địa Trung Hải. Sau một lượt viếng thăm các cảng tại khu vực Tây Địa Trung Hải và eo biển Manche, nó khởi hành từ Southampton, Anh Quốc vào ngày 1 tháng 7 năm 1924 quay về Hoa Kỳ để được đại tu tại Norfolk, Virginia. Sau đó nó tiến hành huấn luyện tại vùng biển Caribe và vùng bờ Đông, trước khi vượt Thái Bình Dương để phục vụ cùng Hạm đội Á Châu.

Sau khi đi đến Yên Đài, Trung Quốc vào ngày 14 tháng 6 năm 1925, Simpson tham gia các hoạt động thường lệ của Hạm đội Á Châu, tiến hành huấn luyện tại các căn cứ Thanh Đảo và Yên Đài vào mùa Hè và Manila, Philippines vào mùa Đông, và viếng thăm các cảng Trung Quốc trên đường đi. Trong năm 1925, sự bất ổn tại Trung Quốc gia tăng do sự lớn mạnh của các lực lượng Quốc Dân Đảng cùng các vụ bạo loạn chống người nước ngoài tại Thượng Hải và Quảng Châu. Các tàu khu trục thuộc Hạm đội Á Châu được phái đi tăng cường cho các pháo hạm tuần tra trên sông Dương Tử và dọc theo bờ biển phía Nam gần Quảng Châu. Simpson đã giúp giải cứu một số nhà truyền giáo tại Deep Bay, Hong Kong vào ngày 2 và 3 tháng 7 năm 1925, và trong nhiều năm tiếp theo đã thực hiện nhiều chuyến tuần tra tại vùng biển Trung Quốc bảo vệ tính mạng và tài sản của công dân Hoa Kỳ. Chiếc tàu khu trục đã có mặt tại Nam Kinh khi Nhật Bản tấn công bằng không quân và hải quân tại Thượng Hải vào cuối tháng 1 năm 1932, và nó đã hỗ trợ cho các nhà ngoại giao Hoa Kỳ tại thủ đô phía Nam của Trung Quốc vào những ngày đầu nguy cấp của vụ khủng hoảng này, cũng như gửi các báo cáo quan trọng về Washington. Vào ngày 11 tháng 2, nó đi đến Thượng Hải, và đến ngày 23 tháng 2 lại đi đến Sán Đầu, nơi nó ở lại cho đến ngày 2 tháng 4 năm 1932. Vào ngày 18 tháng 4, chiếc tàu khu trục cùng với đội của nó rời Manila quay trở về Hoa Kỳ.

Sau khi được đại tu tại Xưởng hải quân Mare Island, Simpson gia nhập Hải đội Khu trục trực thuộc Lực lượng Chiến trận tại San Diego, California vào ngày 28 tháng 9 năm 1932, và tiến hành các hoạt động tập trận hạm đội và huấn luyện dọc theo vùng bờ Tây trong nhiều năm tiếp theo. Khi thực tập ban đêm trong khuôn khổ một cuộc tập trận Vấn đề Hạm đội ngoài khơi vịnh Guantánamo, Cuba, nó mắc tai nạn va chạm với tàu tuần dương hạng nhẹ Milwaukee vào ngày 7 tháng 5 năm 1934, và phải được sửa chữa tại Xưởng hải quân Philadelphia. Nó tiến hành huấn luyện mùa Hè tại Newport trước khi quay trở lại San Diego vào ngày 10 tháng 11, và tiếp nối các hoạt động huấn luyện cùng Hạm đội Thái Bình Dương cũng như tham gia các cuộc tập trận Vấn đề Hạm đội hàng năm vào các năm 1936, 1937 và 1938.

Vào ngày 6 tháng 3 năm 1939, Simpson băng qua kênh đào Panama để đi sang khu vực Đại Tây Dương, và từ ngày 5 tháng 6 đến ngày 30 tháng 8 năm 1939 đã thực hiện ba chuyến đi huấn luyện cho học viên sĩ quan của Học viện Hải quân Hoa Kỳ. Sau đó nó tiến hành các chuyến đi huấn luyện cho nhân sự Hải quân Dự bị, nhưng do xung đột bắt đầu nổ ra tại Châu Âu, nó được phân nhiệm vụ Tuần tra Trung lập, và lên đường đi đến vùng biển Caribe vào ngày 6 tháng 9. Tại đây, nó thực hiện tuần tra cũng như tham gia các cuộc thực tập, bao gồm một cuộc tập trận đổ bộ của hạm đội tại Culebra, Puerto Rico từ ngày 14 tháng 2 đến ngày 10 tháng 3 năm 1940. Sau một chuyến đi huấn luyện học viên sĩ quan và một đợt huấn luyện quân nhân dự bị trong mùa Hè, nó tiếp nối nhiệm vụ Tuần tra Trung lập tại vùng biển Caribe vào tháng 10.

Thế Chiến II Sửa đổi

Simpson nằm trong thành phần một lực lượng được hình thành vào ngày 18 tháng 3 năm 1941, sau khi có thỏa thuận Cho thuê-Cho mượn, để bảo vệ các đoàn tàu tàu vận tải Hoa Kỳ và Anh Quốc tại vùng biển Bắc Đại Tây Dương. Sau nhiều tháng hoạt động tuần tra và hộ tống ven biển, nó hộ tống hai đoàn tàu khởi hành từ Argentia, Newfoundland, để gặp gỡ các tàu hộ tống Hải quân Anh ngoài khơi Greenland từ ngày 30 tháng 6 đến ngày 3 tháng 9 năm 1941. Vào ngày 24 tháng 9 ngoài khơi Iceland, nó tham gia đoàn tàu vận tải đầu tiên hướng sang phía Tây được các tàu chiến Hoa Kỳ hộ tống, và đưa chúng đến Argentia an toàn vào ngày 4 tháng 10. Sau khi Hoa Kỳ tham chiến vào tháng 12, các chuyến hộ tống vận tải của nó kéo dài đến vùng quần đảo Anh, và nó tiếp tục nhiệm vụ hộ tống vận tải vượt đại dương cho đến ngày 28 tháng 4 năm 1942, khi nó đi vào Xưởng hải quân Boston để đại tu.

Trong gần một năm sau khi rời xưởng tàu vào tháng 5 năm 1942, Simpson hộ tống các đoàn tàu vận tải đi dọc theo bờ biển phía Đông của Hoa Kỳ, thực hiện một chuyến đi đến Casablanca vào tháng 2 năm 1943, vào ngày 28 tháng 4 năm 1943 bắt đầu được đại tu tại Xưởng hải quân New York. Trở ra khơi vào tháng 5, Simpson hộ tống một đoàn tàu vận tải đi từ New York đến Curaçao, Tây Ấn, rồi thực hiện hai chuyến đi khứ hồi từ Curaçao đến Londonderry Port, Bắc Ireland. Vào ngày 29 tháng 8 năm 1943, Simpson tham gia một đội đặc nhiệm tàu sân bay hộ tống hình thành chung quanh chiếc Santee và hộ tống một đoàn tàu vận tải đi từ Bermuda đến Casablanca, Bắc Phi. Đội đặc nhiệm sau đó thực hiện tuần tra chống tàu ngầm ngoài khơi quần đảo Azores, tham gia một đoàn tàu vận tải hướng sang phía Tây vào ngày 22 tháng 9, nhưng lại tiếp nối hoạt động tuần tra sau khi một tàu ngầm đối phương được báo cáo xuất hiện gần Azores vào ngày 26 tháng 9. Simpson quay trở về Hoa Kỳ vào ngày 12 tháng 10, nhưng quay lại khu vực Azores cho các cuộc tuần tra khác từ ngày 28 tháng 10 đến ngày 9 tháng 12 năm 1943.

Simpson được đề cử vào ngày 1 tháng 12 năm 1943 để được cải biến thành một tàu vận chuyển cao tốc với ký hiệu lườn APD-27, nhưng được thay thế vào tháng 1 năm 1944 bởi chiếc tàu chị em George E. Badger, mà đến lượt nó việc cải biến lại bị hủy bỏ. Tiếp nối nhiệm vụ hộ tống vận tải, Simpson hộ tống cho chiếc Antaeus trong hơn ba tháng từ ngày 29 tháng 12 năm 1943 đến ngày 9 tháng 4 năm 1944 khi chiếc này vận chuyển binh lính dọc theo vùng bờ Đông. Trong thời gian còn lại của năm 1944 và đầu năm 1945, nó hộ tống cho các tàu chiến hạng nặng vừa mới nhập biên chế trong các chuyến đi chạy thử máy và huấn luyện dọc theo vùng bờ Đông. Trong số các tàu chiến mà nó từng phục vụ bao gồm các thiết giáp hạm WisconsinMissouri, tàu tuần dương Alaska và các tàu sân bay TiconderogaAntietam.

Simpson được xếp lại lớp như một tàu phụ trợ với ký hiệu lườn AG-97 vào ngày 23 tháng 5 năm 1945. Mọi vũ khí được tháo dỡ, và nó được trang bị giá mang ngư lôi thực hành cùng một tời kéo mục tiêu. Nó đi đến vịnh Guantánamo, Cuba vào ngày 16 tháng 6 năm 1945, và làm nhiệm vụ huấn luyện tại đây trong gần một năm. Đến ngày 11 tháng 5 năm 1946, chiếc tàu khu trục kỳ cựu đi đến Xưởng hải quân Philadelphia để ngừng hoạt động. Được cho rút khỏi danh sách Đăng bạ Hải quân vào ngày 19 tháng 6 năm 1946, Simpson bị bán cho hãng Northern Metals Company ở Philadelphia, Pennsylvania vào ngày 21 tháng 11 năm 1946 để tháo dỡ.


Edward VIII was ‘obsessive’ and ‘suffocating’ with American divorcee Wallis Simpson, doc says

When Edward VIII passed away in 1972 at age 77, he seemingly left behind an epic love story of a British king who gave up the throne to marry the American woman he loved -- but in reality, it was far from a fairy tale.

The relationship between Edward and socialite Wallis Simpson is explored in Smithsonian Channel’s docuseries titled “Private Lives of the Monarchs,” which aims to uncover the “illicit affairs and secret scandals” hidden behind palace doors. It previously explored the life of Queen Elizabeth II’s younger sister, the late Princess Margaret, who was previously depicted by the press as a “playgirl” who wasn’t afraid to challenge tradition.

U.K.-based historian and royal author Tracy Borman, who is also the show’s host, told Fox News she was surprised to learn how obsessive the Duke of Windsor was over the divorcee.

“There’s a myth that he had one of history’s greatest love affairs -- but it is a myth,” she explained. “Giving up the throne for the love of a woman sounds incredibly romantic, but if you delve deep into Edward’s character and into his relationship with Wallis, you’ll realize that it’s not all as it appears. He was actually a very flawed character. He grew up with all sorts of insecurities. He was quite childlike when it came to women. And you definitely see that when it comes to his relationship with Wallis. She’s almost like a mother figure to Edward.”

The Duke and Duchess of Windsor arriving at the country home of Major Edward Dudley Metcalfe in Coleman's Hatch, Sussex, their first visit to England in three years, circa 1939. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)

According to her research, Borman learned that Simpson may have felt suffocated by the marriage, which lasted until Edward’s death. The couple originally tied the knot in 1937.

“You get this feeling that, while you should be deeply grateful that this man gave up the throne for you, she actually found him a bit too much,” said Borman. “She wants to get away from him and has an affair. I was just really shocked by all of that when we were doing some of the research for this series. It just wasn’t what I was expecting. I was expecting romance and great sacrifices. It turned out to be so different from that. Arguably, Edward did the best thing by abdicating the throne. I’m not sure he would have made a great king, to be honest.”

When Edward first met Simpson in the fall of 1930, she was still married to her second husband, American-born British shipbroker Ernest Simpson. For decades, Simpson was accused of trapping Edward in a seductive web as part of her plan to become queen.

But Borman suspects Edward had no desire to become king of England to begin with.

The Duke (1894 - 1972) and Duchess (1896 - 1986) of Windsor, (formerly Edward VIII and Wallis Simpson) at their home, the Villa La Croe in Cap D'Antibes, Cannes in France, where they spent the New Year, circa 1939. (Photo by Fox Photos/Getty Images)

“He was always looking for an excuse,” she shared. “He hated the attention. Hated being in the spotlight. He had a difficult relationship with his father. If it weren’t for Wallis, he might have used something else. I truly believe it would have been something else that would have made him give up the throne.”

According to her findings, it was Edward who quickly became captivated by Simpson. His affections towards her, even after their marriage, was described by Borman as “clingy and cloying.”

“He just wanted her all to himself,” said Borman. “He was quite suffocating when it came to his love for Wallis. That’s why there were rumors of her having an affair -- to escape. It would have been disastrous for the monarchy. He just wanted to be in her company all the time and it was very clear that for him, Wallis was everything. She was enough for him to give up the crown. It was a weight of responsibility lifted. But… all of this must have felt such a pressure for her to be everything that Edward wanted. He just wanted to be with her 24/7. They were hardly ever [apart]. And he quickly became quite jealous [if] she spoke to any other man.”

“Ironically, this suffocating behavior actually drove her from him,” Borman continued. “They obviously never separated, but it really made her want to have space because he was just desperate to possess her entirely. … He didn’t know how to act around others. He just wanted what he wanted. And when the government told him he couldn’t have Wallis, it became this huge obsession.”

The Duchess of Windsor wearing a gown, reclining on a chaise. (Photo by Horst P. Horst/Condé Nast via Getty Images)

Borman also pointed out that Edward was fascinated with Americans, which only lured him into further falling for Wallis. He would even practice speaking with an American accent and had clothes shipped to him from the U.S., which reportedly appalled his father, King George V.

“He admired the American dream -- that if you work hard enough for something if you really go for it, you can get whatever you want,” said Borman. “There was something in that hopeful characteristic of Americans that Edward fell completely in love with.”

After their marriage, Edward and Simpson lived in Paris but they hoped to return to England, the New York Times reported. But in 1940, he was given the governorship of the Bahamas, where the couple stayed for five years. Simpson kept busy by working for the Red Cross and raising money for charities. In 1961, she insisted that sending the duke to the Bahamas was really a scheme to get rid of him.

“My husband has been punished like a small boy who gets a spanking every day of his life for a single transgression,” she said at the time, as reported by the outlet.

Wallis Simpson, Duchess of Windsor and Prince Edward, Duke of Windsor attend Maurice Chevalier Opening on October 4, 1968 at the Theatre Champs-Elysees in Paris, France. (Photo by Ron Galella/Ron Galella Collection via Getty Images)

Still, the couple stayed together despite their differences, the outlet noted. They even went on to spend most of their time in urban settings despite Edward’s love of the countryside and gardening because she preferred cities. And while he didn’t care for social affairs, he still attended them with Simpson by his side.

The couple had no children and Simpson remained single for her final years. She passed away in 1986 at age 89.

Borman said she is aware that Meghan Markle, an American, is still compared to Simpson. However, she finds those comparisons unfair.

“It’s not like [her husband] Prince Harry has given up anything,” she pointed out. “He is way down in the order of succession. And people do want a different life, even members of the royal family. Not all necessarily want to be part of that strict protocol that comes with the role. It’s a real shame because she and Harry were a huge force of good for the monarchy. But I don’t blame them in [stepping back].”

Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex attend The Endeavour Fund Awards at Mansion House on March 05, 2020 in London, England. (Photo by Samir Hussein/WireImage/Getty)

“I suppose that on a very simplistic level, yes, here is a British prince running off with an American and seemingly giving up everything for her,” she shared. “But that’s far-fetched. These are different times and two very different couples. Harry and Meghan are a solidly modern couple who don’t want to work within an ancient establishment. They yearn for privacy and family and just a life they can call their own. Just like the story of Edward and Wallis, the one of Meghan and Harry is much more complex.”


An Opportunity To Practice Virtue

Think of what a speech is: a person standing in front of a gathering and saying words. The thing that made this speech so great was that it wasn’t just words. Marcus laid out a plan of action for present and future generations.

Everything he said he did. It wasn’t just philosophy of the mind, it was conducted in the real world. Not only was this conducted in his time, but he left his action as an example to all those who would come after.

The army may have expected a fiery speech about treachery, but they didn’t get that. Marcus would announce he would forgive Cassius and those who sided with him in the revolt. He would use this horrific event as an opportunity to practice virtue — kindness and forgiveness.

He would simultaneously act as a cheerleader to encourage his troops, a wise father giving an example, and a stoic sage teaching how to relate to other people.

Stunningly, Marcus would also announce that he would have abdicated the throne if Cassius would have convinced him and the Senate it would have been the right thing to do.

Marcus would raise the forces to quell the rebellion, but would give the perpetrators every chance to surrender with no consequences. He would use the event as an example to his fellow Romans and to us this very day.

As Marcus encountered his civil war in the form of armies, we encounter ours in the form of battles that take a personal and political nature. The Roman emperor used the struggle as an opportunity to improve himself and practice virtue. Perhaps that should be our approach as well.

Our first instinct may be to banish those traitors to the 9th ring of an icy hell, but maybe a warmer response should be used. As Marcus said, there is even a “right way” to deal with civil war (whatever that personal war is for us).

In the end, Marcus’ legions would never have to raise a sword. Cassius’ own men would turn against him and kill him. Marcus would still use the event to show tolerance to the traitors. He would even put the family of Cassius under his own personal protection.


Simpson DD- 221 - History

was a very slow one until, by reason of the railroad station, which was built in 1845, a boom set in and Alden soon had several hundred inhabitants. In 1854 William C. Leonard founded, together with others, who like him were interested in the education of the children, the "Alden Seminary." It prospered for some years but as the public schools improved and the attendance became less from year to year it had to be closed. The village was incorporated on May 7th, 1869 and the first officials were: G.F. Vandervoort, E.W. Hendee, D.C. Skeels, J.B. Pride and A.D. Farnsworth, Trustees, William A. Sanders, Clerk, H.R. Kidder, Treasurer, C.N. Fulton, Assessor, M. Maxson, Street Commissioner and Frederick Thatcher, Collector.

The small village of West Alden lies about one and one half miles in southwesterly direction from the village of Alden. It was formerly known as Alden Centre and consisted only of a few farm houses, a hotel and a few small stores and shops. Before 1860 Alden Centre had a post office, the name of which was 10 years later changed to West Alden the village also received this name. In 1865 F.R. Martin opened a store there.[1]

Caption under picture at center reads New Post Office Building

[1] The German text states "In 1865 I.R. Martin opened a store, which first he managed in partnership with B.F. Peck. Later he managed the concern himself." Return to text

This small hamlet is situated on the road between Alden and Buffalo, and is mainly populated by Germans, the first of whom settled there fifty years ago. The Evangelical Lutheran Church was founded in 1853. The Elders at that time were: Jacob Weber and Christian Billiard.[1] Deacons: Daniel Schneider and Philip Wiederrecht. Trustees: Johann Nicolaus Kiefer, Jacob Kientz and Michael Asmus. The present new church was built in 1875. The first minister was Julius Crommel.

The German Evangelical Church was dedicated in 1875 and its first minister was Pastor William Jungk.

is situated in the center of the town and also populated by Germans mostly. In 1850 Michael Killinger opened a grocery store and saloon in 1855 George Holland built a hotel, which soon after that passed into the hands of Jacob Sandmann. The first postmaster of the village was Christopher Strecker, who was succeeded by Michael Killinger. A second hotel was opened in 1865 by George Schank.

A Catholic church was built in 1850, and a new one in 1861. Its first priest was Father F.X. Tschenhens.

is situated in the north-west corner of the Town of Alden. The first house in this village was built in 1817 by Moses Case, who established the first grocery store in the village in 1848. His son, Hugh Case, was the first postmaster.

The first German Lutheran Church was built in 1867. Previous to that time the congregation worshipped in the schoolhouse. The first minister was Pastor Julius Crommel.

is a station on the New York Central Railroad, and is situated about a mile south-east of Mill Grove. The first settler was Henry Gehm, who settled there in 1848. He was followed in 1849 by H.A. Wende, who established in 1950 a planing mill on the Eleven-mile Creek, and which was in use until 1876. In 1857 Michael Killinger opened the first grocery store.

Caption under picture at center reads First Presbyterian Church

is situated between Mill Grove and Crittenden. Among the first settlers were: Parker Marshall, E.B. Banks and John Stonebraker. In the years from 1830 to 1840 many German immigrants settled here.

is situated on the New York Central Railroad, three miles north of Alden. In 1848 Benjamin Arbuckle built the first house in this village, which was later on used as a hotel by A. Bump.

According to trustworthy authorities the first settlement of this place dates from 1803. The names of the pioneers were: Asa and James Woodward, who were followed by Warren Hull, Mathew Wing and Joe Parmalee. In 1811 Ahaz Allen built the first feed mill. Rev. John Spencer, better known under the name of "Father Spencer", was the best known among the first ministers of the town. After the war many settlers came to the town. They cultivated the fruitful soil with industry and patience, and raised sheep. At that time it was nothing unusual for them to be visited by the wolves, and they had to defend their sheep against them. About 1830 many more settlers, mostly Germans, came, and they built the first German Lutheran Church in 1835. The first supervisor of the town was John Brown.

Soon after Ahaz Allen in 1811, as mentioned before, had established the first mill in the Town of Lancaster, Joseph Carpenter built a hotel there. This was, so to speak, the birth of the village. For a long time the village did not grow very fast, but after the opening of the Erie Canal there was a marked improvement. In 1849 the village was incorporated, and the first officials were elected. The names of these were: Trustees: John McClean, John Berger, Charles Kurtz, D.R. Osgood, and Ira Slepper. Assessor: E.M. Safford. Collector: John M. Safford. Clerk: Henry L. Bingham. Treasurer: William H. Grimes. In the same year many Dutchman settled in the village. They had quite a little money, and a raise of land values soon took place, from $50 to $75 per acre being paid. In 1865 Lancaster was thrown into

Caption under picture at center reads Power House, Niagara Street

quite a little excitement through the rumor that oil wells had been discovered. Different trials were made to use the wells, but the result was of so little value that further trials - as elsewhere in Erie County - were soon abandoned. About this time a German established an organ factory, which was later conducted by William H. Grimes on a large scale. The first German Evangelical Church was organized in 1835. We have not been able to get further dates in connection herewith, except that C.L. Knapp was minister of it in 1847, and served the congregation for a good many years. In 1875 the congregation built a handsome massive church.

The German Methodist congregation in Lancaster was at first not very large, but grew when the Lutheran church was bought in 1874. We have not been able to get the names of the first officials of this church.

Until 1850 a Catholic priest came every Sunday to Lancaster, but in that year the building of a church was started, it being finished in 1852. At that time Father Sergius Stchonlepnikoff was the priest of the catholic congregation. He was followed by F. Stephen Ulrich.[1]

This village is, as mentioned before, really the oldest in the Town of Lancaster. James and Asa Woodward were the first settlers. In 1811 Benjamin Bowman bought the already existing feed mill, and through him the village got its name.

is a very small village with about forty or fifty houses, three churches, two hotels, and several stores.

Town Cheektowaga borders north on Amherst, east on Lancaster, south on West Seneca, and west on Buffalo. It is five and one-fourth miles wide from east to west, and about six miles long from north to south. The first settler was Apollos Hitchcock. He came there in 1808. He was followed a few years later by Samuel Le Seur, Major Noble, Roswell Hatch and others. Bears and wolves were numerous

Caption under picture at center reads View of Part of Delaware Avenue

at that time, even panthers showed themselves at different times, but deer were seldom to be found. In 1815 Jesse Munson opened the first tavern in the town. On April 10th, 1818, the territory of Cheektowaga became a part of Amherst. In 1826 a large part of the Buffalo Creek Reservation was bought from the Indians. To this territory belonged a strip of land, about three miles in length, which forms today the north-west corner of the present town of Cheektowaga. This strip was at once opened for settlement, and in 1830 so many Germans came there, that at present the town is populated by Germans mostly.

Cheektowaga was separated from Amherst on March 20th, 1829, and incorporated as a town by itself. As a proof how strong the Germans were in the town, even in the earlier years, we give below a list of the town officals elected in 1883: Friedrich Stephen [1], Supervisor J.H. Stock [2], Town Clerk Daniel Reiser, Joseph Dueringer and William Brennan, Justices of the Peace A.M. Dunn, Assessor Joseph Groell, Collector Anthony Pfohl, Highway Commissioner John Prefert, Overseer of the Poor George Neyerlein, Peter Baumler and Michael Lauther, Jr., Constables Charles H. Storck, Edward Ernst and Frank Zubrick, Inspectors of Election A.G. Nagle and Edward Monin, Excise Commissioners.

This town is situated in the center of the eastern border of Erie County, and is six miles long from north to south, and nearly three and three-fourths miles wide from east to west. In the north it borders on Town Alden, west on Elma, south on Wales and east on Bennington, Wyoming County. In August, 1826, the Ogden Company bought of the Indians, besides other lands, a strip of land, three and one-half miles long and one mile wide, situated in the eastern part of the Buffalo Creek Reservation. This territory contained that part of the Town Marilla, which now lies east of the "Two Rod Road". In the spring of 1827 Jesse Bartow settled in the southern district of the town, but he soon sold the settlement to John M. Bauder. Soon after the land sale of 1826 two roads were surveyed. One ran from Portersville to the Village of


Life After the O.J. Trial

The close bond between Kardashian and Simpson eventually frayed. In 1996, Kardashian told ABC News that he had doubts over Simpson’s innocence. He said that “The blood evidence is the biggest thorn in my side that causes me the greatest problems. So I struggle with the blood evidence.&apos&apos Kardashian also was interviewed by author Larry Schiller for his book American Tragedy, which examined Simpson’s trial and defense team.

Divorced from his wife Kris in 1991, Kardashian married two more times. He and his third wife Ellen Pierson tied the knot in 2003, shortly after Kardashian was diagnosed with esophageal cancer. Kardashian died only weeks later on September 30, 2003, at his Los Angeles home. He was 59 years old.

In 2016, the television series, American Crime Story: People v. O.J. Simpson, premiered. David Schwimmer played Kardashian on the show, which explores the trial in detail.


Watch the video: Симпсоны диван сбежал от гомера (June 2022).


Comments:

  1. Salem

    What nice answer

  2. Thu

    I apologize for not being able to help. I hope they will help you here. Do not despair.

  3. Macdougal

    I do not know that it is possible to tell here and that

  4. Vudogore

    Wonderfully!



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