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Were MTV’s awards the first gender-neutral ones?

Were MTV’s awards the first gender-neutral ones?


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MTV made waves when Emma Watson was awarded a non-gender specific “Best Actor” award for her performance in “Beauty and the Beast.” But while this may be a first for the MTV Movie & TV Awards, it’s not a first for the entertainment industry.

For the top honors in film and theater, awards have always been gender-specific. The Academy Awards have split their performance categories since the first “Oscars” were presented in 1929, as has the American Theatre Wing, who’ve been handing out the Tony award to Broadway’s best actors and actresses since 1947.

The early days of television, however, was a bit different, as scripted and unscripted shows like news broadcasts and variety shows all competed for the same recognition. The first ever Primetime Emmy Awards in 1949 didn’t have the traditional actor/actress categories, but saw both female and male nominees face off in the Most Outstanding Television Personality category instead. Shirley Dinsdale beat the likes of Patricia Morison, Rita La Roy, Mike Stokey and Bill Welsh to take home one of the six Emmys handed out that year. While the category title morphed over the years, the award for “best personality” always had female and male contestants. The concept of a gender-neutral “host” category continues today, with both male and female winners coming out on top in both the Primetime and Daytime Emmys. In 1952, another gender-neutral category saw Red Skelton beat Lucille Ball to take home the Best Comedian or Comedienne award—the following year this award was separated by gender.

While the Emmys categories of Best Actor and Best Actress have been in place for over 60 years, that might be changing soon thanks to activists like Asia Kate Dillion who presented Emma Watson with her recent MTV awards. Dillion is the first non-binary performer (identifying as neither male or female) to play a non-binary character. Dillon’s performance on the Showtime series “Billions” has raised the question of what category Dillon could be nominated for, Best Actor or Best Actress. Without a clear answer, Dillion wrote to the Emmys questioning whether the actor/actress divide is still necessary. The television academy’s response, that anyone can submit their work in any category, leaves the door open for future evolution.

While the debate for actors and actresses (and neither) continues, it’s the music industry that’s made the greatest strides in gender-neutral recognition. On April 6, 2011, the Recording Academy announced a drastic restructuring of many Grammy Award categories for the 2012 award season, reducing the number of categories from 109 to 78, and eliminating the gender distinction between soloists and duo/groups in various genre fields.


Emma Watson Won The First Gender-Neutral Acting Award At The MTV Movie Awards

This was the first year that the MTV Movie & TV Awards decided not to split up the acting nominees by gender. For example, the category for Best Actor in a Movie featured three men and three women. Same with Best Hero. Best Actor in a TV Show had four girls and two dudes. It was a very woke show. Emma Watson was up for Best Actor for playing a book-reading beastiality enthusiast in the live-action Beauty and the Beast. She won.

Emma’s award was the first one handed out last night. It was presented by Asia Kate Dillon, who plays the gender non-binary Taylor Mason on Billions. It was fitting that Emma won MTVs first ever gender-neutral award she is an outspoken advocate for gender equality. Emma’s Best Actor acceptance speech touched on MTVs decision to go gender-neutral with their awards, and why she’s proud to receive MTVs first gender non-specific acting trophy.

“Firstly, I feel I have to say something about the award itself. The first acting award in history that doesn’t separate nominees based on their sex says something about how we perceive the human experience. MTV’s move to create a genderless award for acting will mean something different to everyone. But to me, it indicates that acting is about the ability to put yourself in someone else’s shoes. And that doesn’t need to be separated into two different categories.

This is very meaningful to me. Both to be winning the award and to be receiving it from you, Asia. Thank you for educating me in such an inclusive, patient, and loving way. Thank you so much. I think I’m being given this award for a performance as an actor, but it doesn’t feel like that what it’s really for, although I am very grateful if you did think that I did a good job because the whole singing part of the situation was pretty terrifying. Yeah, not kidding about that part!

But more seriously, I think I am being given this award because of who Belle is and what she represents. The villagers in our fairy tale wanted to make Belle believe that the world is smaller than the way she saw it, with fewer opportunities for her—that her curiosity and passion for knowledge and her desire for more in life were grounds for alienation. I loved playing someone who didn’t listen to any of that. I’m so proud to be a part of a film that celebrates diversity, literacy, inclusion, joy, and love the way that this one does.”

Emma has a lot of feelings about winning the first gender-neutral MTV Best Actor award, and apparently so did bridge troll who found a suit and attempted to live with the humans Piers Morgan. Piers got very upset while watching a made-up award show by the channel who airs Teen Mom. He hopped on his old man shouting slab (aka his keyboard) and typed out how much he hated Emma’s speech in a post for The Daily Mail that begins as follows:

“It’s a pity there’s no award for the most pompous, politically-correct personality on the planet because Emma Watson would be shoe-in, whatever gender she claims to be.”

Piers took a dump on self-identity, gender, feminism. He dragged Lady Gaga and Madonna into it, because I believe he gets an asshole energy power-up every time he does that. Piers also sniped at Emma for not wearing a gender-neutral outfit to the MTV Movie & TV Awards. Is Piers blind? Emma is wearing a gender non-specific ensemble. She’s got a sleeve, a halter, a sash, a half-skirt, one dangly earring, a sequinned diaper. I’m pretty sure that covers everyone.

Personally, my panties are unbunched over MTVs gender-neutral awards. If Piers is that upset, maybe the MTV Movie & TV Awards aren’t the right awards show for him. Try the Teen Choice Awards, Pierce. And if that ever gets too progressive for you, I’m sure your assistant can dig up some VHS copies of old Cable Ace Awards.


Piers Morgan Is Very Upset About MTV's Gender-Neutral Awards

For every step forward, there are two to three people trying to prevent another — or, at the very least, vocally complaining about the possibility of progress. Sunday at the MTV Movie & TV Awards, the first-ever gender-neutral acting accolade was awarded to British actress Emma Watson for her role as Belle in Beauty and the Beast. Folks all over the Internet were excited to say goodbye to gendered categories for these awards — an excitement compounded by the fact that Watson's award was presented to her by nonbinary actor Asia Kate Dillon, the Billions star who recently made headlines after they successfully petitioned to choose their own category for the 2017 Emmy Awards. Of course, not everyone is so thrilled. And, being that he is allergic to change, Piers Morgan is one such person.

“Gender neutral awards — just what the world was craving," Morgan grumbles to his cohosts Charlotte Hawkins and Susanna Reid on Good Morning Britain. "I can’t think of a better recipient than Emma Watson, a great flagbearer to all things gender-neutral." Morgan has criticized Watson in the past for posing topless.

Reid begins to say, "To be fair. " but before she can continue, Morgan interjects, "Let's NOT be fair" — a hilariously blunt reminder that something so simple as fairness is unappealing to Morgan. Reid goes on to explain that in the journalism industry, they already give awards sans gender. Morgan does not address her point, instead continuing to lament the potential for genderless Academy Awards categories, as though the very art of cinematography will plunge into darkness if a host has to use they/them pronouns for a gender nonconforming recipient or if four women are nominated and one man (a scenario that is not necessarily likely given Hollywood's history, but it is possible). Most reasonable people already understand this, though.

"Am I wrong? Is it just me or am I a creaking old dinosaur that doesn’t get it?" Morgan asks, seemingly unaware that he has set himself up for prime meme-ifying.

"Should we ban the word 'man' from life itself? Should nothing anymore be male or female?" Morgan inquires. "Little babies just be little babies, no longer boys and girls? Should it all just be ended? Should we end gender as we know it? Is it the end of gender?" Fascinating. Piers Morgan appears to be reading my mind and agrees that, yes, we should acknowledge identities other than male and female. Finally, this grumpy British snowflake is on board with this grumpy New York snowflake so we can live happily and neutrally ever after.

In all seriousness, though, one of the oddest things about the gender binary is the way some people seem wholly obsessed with maintaining it as though they believe it is the thread keeping the world together, and that all societal issues can be somehow solved with cisnormativity. But here's the deal: MTV's awards show went off just fine, and the world continued to turn today. No fights broke out in the streets because Emma Watson was given the award for "best actor" rather than "best actress." And literally no one is insisting that everyone suddenly stops identifying as female or male simply because someone else they know, assigned male at birth, starts using different pronouns. The goal is not a future of total genderlessness, as Morgan seems to fear, but to achieve respect and acknowledgment for all gender identities. After all, nothing good can come of excluding those who are not cisgender — all this does is further ostracize the deeply marginalized trans and gender-nonconforming communities, putting them more at risk than they already are.


The VMAs lead the way with gender neutral categories: should other award shows follow suit?

There are a few things we took note of right away – one of those things being the fact that Cardi B is leading the pack with a whopping 10 nominations (wow). Another interesting point was the fact that for the first time, MTV partnered with Instagram to reveal the results and released them via IGTV, the latest IG update shaking the nation. Case in point, this has certainly been a year of firsts for the award show.

Their nonconventional approach should come as no surprise, though, given their history. The VMAs have always been the type of event to go rogue and do things less traditionally when compared with other award shows like the Oscars, Grammys, or even the Teen Choice Awards. Perhaps one of the elements that most distinguishes the VMAs from other shows is genderless categories.

To clarify, by this we mean that rather than having categories such as “Best Male Artist” or “Best Female Solo Artist of the Year”, they simply have “Best Artist” and “Best Solo Artist of the Year.”

The award show went gender-neutral for the first time last year, and reactions to the change were mixed. While some argued that it’s about time we stop distinguishing artists by gender in acknowledging their success, others argued that gendered categories ensured a more equal playing field, and that women would have a fair amount of representation.

It’s no secret that there are inherently sexist mechanisms at work within the music industry, and concepts like the #MeToo movement have highlighted many of the struggles women face while trying to advance their careers. Thus, we wouldn’t want the move to backfire and see a resulting decline in female artists winning awards.

That said though, having gender-neutral categories also acknowledges the fact that there are countless gender-neutral artists, who don’t identify as male or female and would likely not feel comfortable being categorized into one category or the other in their nomination, and would thus be excluded altogether. Having a non-gender specific category makes sure to include and consider everybody regardless of gender.

It may seem like a small change, but consider the implications. If other award shows like say, the Oscars, were to follow suit, the “Best Supporting Actress” and “Best Actor in a Leading Role” it would just be “Best Actor.” This would, technically, diminish the amount of awards given out altogether, and could potentially make things more competitive.

While no solution seems perfect of obvious, it seems as though the VMAs are pushing things in the right direction. Women continue to hold their own in nominations (did we mention Cardi’s up for 10 noms? I think we did). And this shift towards ditching gendered awards, while a significant change, could help lead the music industry to be entirely more inclusive in their recognition of talent.


Emma Watson Receives First Genderless MTV Award

Billions (2016-) actress Asia Kate Dillon, who identifies as gender nonbinary, handed out the first MTV Movie & TV Award for Best Actor in a Movie to Watson for her portrayal of Belle in Beauty and the Beast (2017).

This was the first gender-neutral award presented at the show. MTV announced the elimination of gender-separated categories in April 2017, instead opting to adopt a more inclusive approach to nominations.

"Great acting is great acting, no matter what the gender or non-gender," MTV general manager Amy Doyle told The Hollywood Reporter, adding that the change resulted from the network's audience "uniformly rejecting obsolete labels and embracing fluidity."

"It really was a cultural statement," she added. "And it really is reflective about the audience's views and when you look at the culture as a whole, you had a man against a woman running for president [last year]. It just felt like a dated construct for a category."

Watson celebrated her big win with a powerful speech, remarking on MTV's forward-thinking decision to remove gender from their award show. "The first acting award in history that doesn't separate nominees by their sex says something about the way we perceive the human experience," she said (via People). "MTV's move to create a genderless award for acting will mean something different to everyone. But to me, it indicates that acting is about the ability to put yourself in someone else's shoes and that doesn't need to be separated into two different categories."

She also thanked Dillon, who previously made history for being the first gender nonbinary identifying actor to star in a major TV series. "Empathy and the ability to use your imagination should have no limits," Watson stated (via Entertainment Weekly). "This is very meaningful for me, both to be winning the award and to be receiving it from you, Asia. Thank you for educating me in such an inclusive, patient, and loving way."

The 27-year-old went on, "I think I'm being given this award because of who Belle is and what she represents. The villagers in our fairy tale wanted to make Belle believe that the world was smaller than the way she saw it with fewer opportunities for her, that her curiosity and passion for knowledge and her desire for more in life were grounds for alienation. I loved playing someone who didn't listen to any of that. I'm so proud to be a part of a film that celebrates diversity, literacy, inclusion, joy, and love the way that this one does."

Congratulations again to Watson and bravo to MTV for making a change that better reflects today's society.


The Jeff Awards go gender neutral but still manage to favor men

Michael Shannon with his 2013 Jeff Award for Best Actor for Simpatico and director Guy Van Swearingen of A Red Orchid Theatre

This is the year that the Jeff Awards, given every year for excellence in Chicago theater, kissed their venerable best actor and best actress categories goodbye and created a controversy.

Seeking to be more inclusive, the Jeffs announced plans to do away with gendered awards for acting, opting instead to recognize two best performers, not restricted to gendered categories. But in doing so, they’ve tilted even more in favor of male-identified performers.

The Jeff Awards committee is already saddled with the public perception that it's too old and too white to accurately represent theater professionals, audiences, or the world. And this year’s crop of nominees isn’t helping.

The committee had its nose rubbed in its image problem last year when Tracy Letts infamously went off on it in an interview published in the Tribune, calling it "a club to get free tickets" and "a sea of white faces."

Shortly after that, the committee commissioned a no-holds-barred study of the Jeffs and their reputation, and in February announced that it was making changes: ramping up public communication and outreach cutting in half the enormous time commitment for new committee members (who had been required to see 150 shows in the first year) and actively recruiting "younger and minority candidates" for the committee (which is capped at 55 members and has a waiting list).

Jeffs spokesman Jeffrey Marks says it was also in the last year that the committee began to discuss a problem with the "best actor" and "best actress" categories. "We had a couple nominations coming up, [and] some actors that didn't identify either way." Also, he says, Jeff judges saw portrayals of Oscar Wilde's Lady Bracknell in two different productions, one by a man, the other by a woman, and asked why they weren't competing with each other.

"Because it's the character you're assessing," Marks explains, "not the sex of the actor." They decided that, beginning with the 2018 awards, the Jeffs would be gender-neutral.

In fact, that's what many of the awards already were. There's never been an award for best female director or best male designer, for example. To maintain the number of winners in the acting categories, two awards would be given in each category.

The Jeff Awards are divided into Equity and non-Equity wings and are handled in two separate programs. The first non-Equity awards in the new categories were given out in June, with little comment about the change Marks notes that the split among winners "worked out pretty evenly."

But after the Equity nominations were announced in August, there were protests on social media. It looked like gender parity had been collateral damage: the gender-neutral categories had produced a list of nominees that was markedly dominated by male-identified performers.

Director and DePaul University Theatre School faculty member Lisa Portes was among those who took notice. When I reached her by phone last week, she said she was in favor of the change but concerned about the apparently unintended effect.

"Moving to nongender-binary classifications is the right thing to do," Portes added. "I think, however, attention must still be paid to equity, to understanding that&mdashalthough it's shifting&mdashthere are less lead roles in place for women."

Brad Erickson, executive director of San Francisco's Theatre Bay Area Awards, the first among the American theater awards to announce that it would go gender-neutral (following the MTV Movie & TV Awards, which made the change in 2017), told me their results in the first year have been balanced. But, he said, regarding any potential imbalance, "This came to me in the last month or so: The old system of male/female awards potentially masks the problem. It's a kind of fun-house mirror. We say, 'Oh look, an equal number of men and women won awards.' Of course they did, so you're making it seem like there's parity, when there's not. If there really isn't a balance, these [gender-neutral] award systems are [more accurate] mirrors of the field. If there's a big imbalance in the awards, it's not the awards' fault. It's what's happening in programming."

Says Marks: "The issue of diversity in theater for awards does not start with the Jeff Awards. It ends at the Jeff Awards. It's up to the theaters to put on the [work of a variety of] stage directors, actors, set designers, lighting designers, choreographers. All we do is judge the excellence of what they put on."

The winners of the 2018 Jeff Equity Awards will be announced at Drury Lane Oakbrook on October 22. v

Editors’ note: This article has been emended to clear up ambiguities in the original story and to correct an error of fact introduced by the editors.


Non-binary actors are asking awards like the Oscars and Emmys to change. Here’s one way to fix them.

When Asia Kate Dillon presented Emma Watson with an MTV Movie Award in 2017 for best performance in a movie, it was a night of firsts. Dillon, the first openly non-binary actor to play a non-binary character in a major TV show, was presenting the first gender-neutral acting award in a major award ceremony.

Earlier that year, Dillon sparked industry-wide conversation after going through the Emmy nomination process for playing the character Taylor Mason in Showtime’s “Billions.” The Emmys award acting in binary gendered categories — actor and actress. Dillon, who doesn’t identify as male or female, wrote a letter to the Emmys challenging that system.

“There is no room for my identity within that award system binary,” Dillon wrote in their letter. “Furthermore, if the categories of ‘actor’ and ‘actress’ are meant to denote assigned sex I ask, respectfully, why is that necessary?”

Separate gendered awards have historically had the effect of addressing one piece of Hollywood’s problem with gender: Women aren’t cast as often as men in the sorts of roles that get nominations for awards. Supporters of continuing or expanding gendered awards often point to gender-neutral categories in which women are completely shut out.

According to the USC Annenberg Inclusion Initiative, almost 11 percent of the 100 highest-grossing films of 2019 were directed by women, up from only 4.5 percent in 2018. And yet no female directors were nominated for a feature film directing award by the Golden Globes, BAFTAs, Directors Guild or Oscars in 2020. That exclusion led “Honey Boy” director Alma Har’el to publicly call for a separate female director category. “Unless we have a new category for women directors — the same way we have [separate] actor and actress categories — we won’t see any changes,” she told Variety.

This separate-but-equal approach, however, doesn’t address the growing cohort of actors, film professionals and audience members who don’t identify on the gender binary.

“Young people are identifying less with the gender binary and it’s, I think, a necessity for survival for organizations to reflect the society that we’re living in,” says Zackary Drucker, an actor and artist who consulted on Amazon Studios’ “Transparent.”

Most award ceremonies show no sign of reconsidering their categories, though there are a few notable exceptions. In those cases, it seems gender-neutral categories don’t necessarily mean women are excluded from recognition.

The Television Critics Association Awards have been gender-neutral the longest, since they began handing out individual achievement awards for comedy and drama in 1997. Although the gender distribution over time for those award recipients is nowhere near parity, women have been awarded consistently in those categories since 2010. After the MTV Movie and TV Awards for acting went genderless in 2017, women dominated. Since the Grammys reconfigured their categories for pop, R&B, rock and country performances, the winners in those categories have been pretty evenly split — except for the rock category, which men have won almost every year.


Emma Watson vs. Piers Morgan re Gender Neutral Award

Enthusiast of the written word, film and television. Student of communication, culture, and management working with RTÉ LifeStyle.

Piers Morgan went on a rant surrounding MTV's gender-neutral awards claiming that Emma Watson's acceptance speech for "best actor" was simply ridiculous.

The Beauty and the Beast star won the first ever gender-neutral acting award at this year's MTV Movie and TV Awards, bringing home that golden popcorn bucket for her role as Belle on Sunday night.

When she was announced as the winner of the category "best actor" by non-binary actor Asia Kate Dillon, Emma gave an empowering speech about the meaning of this revolutionary award:

"Firstly, I feel I have to say something about the award itself. The first acting award in history that doesn't separate nominees based on their sex says something about how we perceive the human experience. MTV's move to create a genderless award for acting will mean something different to everyone."

She went on to explain what the existence of a gender-neutral award means to her personally:

"But to me, it indicates that acting is about the ability to put yourself in someone else's shoes. And that doesn't need to be separated into two different categories."

Emma Watson accepts Best Actor in a Movie for 'Beauty and the Beast' from Asia Kate Dillon onstage during the 2017 MTV Movie And TV Awards.

Emma then showed her appreciation for Asia Kate Dillon, who raised awareness about the issues that come along with gendered awards earlier this year:

"This is very meaningful to me. Both to be winning the award and to be receiving it from you, Asia. Thank you for educating me in such. in such an inclusive, patient, and loving way. Thank you so much."

The 27-year-old British activist then reflected on why she thinks she might have won the award. The actress thanked the character of Belle for her admirable characteristics that form her curiosity, unwavering courage and passionate personality. When speaking about the movie Emma said:

"I'm so proud to be a part of a film that celebrates diversity, literacy, inclusion, joy, and love the way that this one does."

Emma Watson as Belle in the live action remake of Disney's "Beauty and the Beast".

She received tremendous applause for her speech from left, right and center until talk show host Piers weighed in on Good Morning Britain:

"Gender neutral awards, just what the world was craving [. ]."

He went on to ask a series of rhetorical questions to get across his point across:

"Should we ban the word man from life itself? Should nothing anymore be male or female?"

"Little babies just be little babies, no longer boys and girls? Should it all just be ended? Should we end gender as we know it? Is it the end of gender?", he asked sarcastically.

In my opinion, Piers Morgan's comments were flippant and unkind. They are the kind of comments that are easy to say things if you are in a privileged space like he is.

I think gender-neutral awards are exactly the kind of thing that the under-represented people of today's society are craving. It is simply one small step in the right direction.

We, as a society, are often careless with words, categories and the attribution of expectations. The word 'man' does not need to be banned. That is not what gender equality or non-gendered designations are about.

It's about removing limits and expectations that we place on an individual simply because of their gender. It's about representing those who don't want to be defined or can't identify with being just male or female.

The idea of "little babies just being little babies" isn't as crazy as Piers Morgan would have you believe. It would mean that a person could be born into this world without limits and gender expectations being placed upon them.

It would be a life lived candidly and full of endless opportunities - a life, in which nobody would have to waste time wondering if their actions are appropriate for a woman or man to do.

Therefore the answer to most of Piers Morgan's question is YES. We should end gender as we know it - as we were taught to know it by the historical and social conditions of times long past. And nothing should be labeled as male or female anymore if it restricts an individual in its existence and personal growth.

You can read more about why it was so important of MTV to introduce gender-neutral awards and how Asia Kate Dillon raised awareness about the issues of gendered awards by clicking here.


Emma Watson makes history with her gender-neutral award acceptance speech

Emma Watson was declared Best Actor in a Movie at the MTV Movie & TV Awards on Sunday night, for her role in Beauty and the Beast.

The award &ndash the first major gong Watson has received for her starring role as Belle &ndash was a personally significant one for the 27-year-old actor. But as the first gender-neutral acting award in history, it also represented a ground-breaking moment for awards ceremonies in general.

Watson was up against Taraji P. Henson, Daniel Kaluuya, James McAvoy and Hailee Steinfeld for the &ldquogender-free&rdquo Best Actor award, for their roles in Hidden Figures, Get Out, Split and The Edge of Seventeen respectively.

In an emotional acceptance speech, Watson paid tribute to the philosophy behind her MTV Movie award.

&ldquoI feel I have to say something about the award itself &ndash the first acting award in history that doesn&rsquot separate nominees based on their sex,&rdquo she said.

&ldquoIt says something about how we perceive the human experience.&rdquo

Watson continued: &ldquoMTV&rsquos move to create a genderless award for acting will mean something different for everyone, but to me it indicates that acting is about the ability to put yourself in someone else&rsquos shoes &ndash and that doesn't need to be separated into two different categories.&rdquo

&ldquoEmpathy and the ability to use your imagination should have no limits.&rdquo

The Beauty and the Beast actor was presented with the award by Asia Kate Dillon, who plays &ldquogenderqueer&rdquo character Taylor Mason in TV show Billions. Dillon was born female but identifies as non-binary, and made headlines earlier this year when they submitted their name for an Emmy Award in the &lsquoActor&rsquo rather than &lsquoActress&rsquo category, because the former is a more gender-neutral word.

In her acceptance speech, Watson singled out Dillon for praise, saying: &ldquoThis is very meaningful for me both to be winning the award and to be receiving it from you, Asia.

&ldquoThank you for educating me in such an inclusive, patient and loving way.&rdquo

UN ambassador Watson spoke extensively in the run-up to Beauty and the Beast&rsquos release about her desire to make Belle a more &ldquofeminist&rdquo Disney princess. During her acceptance speech, she said that she thought she had been given the award &ldquobecause of who Belle is and what she represents.

&ldquoThe villagers in our fairy tale wanted to make Belle believe that the world is smaller than the way she saw it, with fewer opportunities for her &ndash that her curiosity and passion for knowledge and her desire for more in life were grounds for alienation,&rdquo said Watson.

&ldquoI loved playing someone who didn&rsquot listen to any of that,&rdquo she continued.

&ldquoI&rsquom so proud to be a part of a film that celebrates diversity, literacy, inclusion, joy, and love the way that this one does.&rdquo

Millie Bobby Brown was the first actor to win a gender-neutral Best Actor in a Show award, for her role as Eleven in Netflix&rsquos hit sci-fi mystery series Stranger Things. In her acceptance speech, the 13-year-old British actor thanked the show&rsquos creators for creating &ldquoa badass female iconic character that I&rsquove got the honour to play.&rdquo

With the inevitability of the sun rising in the east and all the nuance of the Kool-Aid man crashing through a wall, Piers Morgan was quick to cast aspersions over MTV&rsquos introduction of gender-neutral awards.

Speaking on This Morning on Monday, the TV presenter &ndash who unwittingly emulates Grandpa Simpson yelling at a cloud on a daily basis &ndash Morgan said: &ldquo&lsquoShould we ban the word man from life itself? Should nothing anymore be male or female?&rdquo

&ldquoLittle babies just be little babies, no longer boys and girls?&rdquo Morgan continued. &ldquoShould it all just be ended? Should we end gender as we know it? Is it the end of gender?&rdquo

It was an interestingly neurotic take from a man known for accusing those he disagrees with of &ldquohysteria&rdquo and &ldquooverreaction&rdquo &ndash but Morgan did also display a heretofore unseen capacity for self-reflection.

&ldquoAm I wrong?&rdquo he asked. &ldquoIs it just me, or am I a creaking old dinosaur that doesn&rsquot get it?&rdquo


Well, Emma Watson made history last night after winning the first-ever gender-neutral award for best actor at the MTV Movie & TV Awards, and her speech was pretty darn epic.

Watson picked up the gong for her turn as Belle in the recent live-action remake of Beauty and the Beast, with the win marking the first time the star has won an award at the show despite having been nominated five times.

The actor was presented the golden popcorn by Asia Kate Dillon, and went on to discuss the importance of the fact that this was the first acting award in history that doesn’t separate nominees by gender, noting that it “says something about how we perceive the human experience.”

“MTV’s move to create a genderless award for acting will mean something different to everyone. But to me, it indicates that acting is about the ability to put yourself in someone else’s shoes, and that doesn’t need to be separated into two different categories,” she said. 𠇎mpathy and the ability to use your imagination should have no limits. This is very meaningful for me, both to be winning the award and to be receiving it from you, Asia. Thank you for educating me in such an inclusive, patient, and loving way.”

Watson went on to say that while she hoped she was also getting the award for her ability as an actor in Beauty and the Beast, she felt that a lot of her win came down to who Belle is as a character.

"I think I&rsquom being given this award because of who Belle is and what she represents," she said. "The villagers in our fairy tale wanted to make Belle believe that the world was smaller than the way she saw it with fewer opportunities for her. That her curiosity and passion for knowledge and her desire for more in life were grounds for alienation. I loved playing someone who didn&rsquot listen to any of that. I&rsquom so proud to be a part of a film that celebrates diversity, literacy, inclusion, joy, and love the way that this one does.&rdquo

Watch Emma Watson’s full speech below.

We couldn’t be happier for Emma Watson for her win last night, and we couldn’t agree more with what she has to say.


Watch the video: Madonna - Like A Virgin Live MTV VMAs 1984 (June 2022).


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